Heal My Pet Natural Healing for Longevity and Health

ESSENTIAL OILS

October 4, 2013 / by Faerie DogMother

  • NOTE:
  • ESSENTIAL OILS ARE MEDICINAL AND POWERFUL
  • THEY CAN BE TOXIC IF NOT USED PROPERLY
  • THERAPEUTIC UNCONTAMINATED OILS ARE ESSENTIAL
  • EO’s CONTAIN STRONG CHEMICALS, STUDIED AND PROVEN, BUT CAN BE EASILY MISUSED. THIS IS A THERAPEUTIC MODALITY THAT SHOULD BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY AND WITH CARE. PLEASE CONSULT A PROFESSIONAL, NOT AN MLM SALESPERSON

Dogs respond well to essential oils.
Cats to Hydrosols but never the pure, undiluted oils – they are too strong and therefore, toxic. This includes diffusers and air fresheners. *See my Feline Page for more on oils for cats. Do not use any essential oils on cats or rabbits without supervision of a medical professional.

ESSOilHMP

 USE ONLY PURE, THERAPEUTIC GRADE OILS

When wild dogs, wolves, cats and horses are sick they seek out certain plants to eat in order to get well. As we domesticated these animals they lost this instinct and their access to wild plants. Plants combine minerals from the soil, water and energy (in the form of sunlight) to produce certain chemical compounds (a process called photosynthesis). These essential chemical compounds nourish the plant, protect the plant, heal broken parts, counteract infections and fungus, attract insects for reproduction and allow the plant to adapt to harsh environmental conditions. All these healing properties are encoded in the plant’s DNA which is embedded in the plant’s resin or essential oilsTo obtain these same healing benefits animals will seek out certain plants, eat them and digest the plant material for the healing chemical compounds. Plant metabolism is a precursor to human existence. Humans have learned to ingest the same plants (or herbs) as animals to metabolize the same healing substances. This process is called the biosynthetic blueprint.

Aromatherapy primarily works on the physical level of animals since animals don’t have many of the emotional connections to scents as humans do. For example, animals don’t connect romance with rose oil and holidays with orange and cinnamon oil the way humans do. It is important to introduce animals to essential oils with a positive experienceDo not introduce animals to essential oils when they are fearful from people, loud noises such as storms or in pain or shock. It is always best to let the animal smell the oil first before applying. Then watch for signs of acceptance such as wanting to lick the oil, rubbing against you or wide-eye and bushy tailed. Signs the animal dislikes the oil are turning their head away, panting, drooling, pacing, whining and sneezing or snorting. Never put essential oils on an animal’s nose or snout. This takes away their freedom of choice and is intrusive therapy. Most companion animals have considerably less body mass than an adult human. The rule-of-thumb recommended for smaller animals is the same as for children—if the dosage for essential oils is not stated start with at least a 10% dilution of the adult human dose. For example, one drop of essential oil to 9 drops of carrier oil (e.g., almond, hazelnut, jojoba, olive oil, coconut, etc).

Dogs have a large nasal cavity and their sense of smell is 50-100 times stronger than humansAlways avoid any oils high in phenols and ketones (see chart above). Avoid stimulating oils of peppermint, rosemary, niaouli, melaleuca (Tea Tree), spearmint, ravensara and eucalyptus unless in highly diluted form. It is alsorecommended to avoid rosemary on dogs that are prone to seizures or with epilepsy. It is not recommended to use essential oils on medium to large breed puppies younger than eight weeks. For small or toy breed puppies wait at least until they are older than ten weeks. When in doubt use the gentler hydrosols (by-products of essential oil distillation) on puppies instead of essential oils.

Oil blends seem to work best on canines. Essential oils have a very profound effect on shelter, rescue and adopted dogs. They help the dog bond with the owner after such a traumatic experience. Veterinarians have reported success using frankincense on dogs with gum disease. Like humans, lemongrass is good for cruciate ligaments and joint injuries. Lavender and a blend of valerian, vetiver, petitgrain, sweet marjoram and sweet orange are good for calming and relieving stress. For arthritis use the anti-inflammatory blend peppermint, cypress, juniper berry and lavender. Dogs and horses, being similar to humans, tolerate oils better than other animals. Cats and birds are a totally different story.

 

Cat’s livers do not have the necessary enzymes to break down and excrete certain chemical compounds in essential oils. The chemical compounds, therefore, accumulate in a cat’s body and are sometimes toxic to the point of death. Cats are very sensitive to beta-carotene, morphine, certain sulfanomides, salicylic acid (Aspirin), acetaminophen (Tylenol), allyl propyl disulfide (onions) and compounds with the bezene ring (benzyl alcohol preservative). Wintergreen and birch oils contain methyl salicylate the same chemical compound in aspirin. It is best to avoid any oil containing phenols: oregano, thyme, cinnamon (cassia), clove, savory, birch, and melaleuca (Tea Tree oil) or ketones: sage. A third group to avoid are the monoterpene hydrocarbons pinene and limonene most commonly found in the citrus and pine oils: lemon, orange, tangerine, mandarin, grapefruit, lime, bergamot, pine, spruce, and any fir oil. Many household cleaners and even pet products have these latter substances in them to make them smell nice to the owners. Symptoms of a toxic buildup include being despondent, clumsy, uncoordinated, partially paralyzed, vomiting, drooling or in a daze. The diagnosis for toxic poisoning is a blood test that shows elevated liver enzymes. It is best to seek a veterinarian’s care if toxic poisoning is suspected.

Hydrosols (by-products of essential oil distillation) are safer to use on cats. This is because the monoterpene alcohols have an affinity for water and are safe for cats. Phenols and ketones do not appear in hydrosols. There are no known case histories of hydrosols or monoterpene alcohols causing toxicity in cats. Hydrosols of chamomile and a combination of rose, lavender, geranium and neroli are known to have a claming effect on cats. Wounds can be cleaned with diluted lavender, rose, geranium, and chamomile oil or their hydrosols. Itching can be alleviated using witch hazel, rose, lavender or German chamomile.

Does this mean we need to stop using essential oils if we have cats? Since there is no scientific evidence that essential oils and hydrosols are totally safe for cats, the safest rule is not to use them on or around cats until they are proven safe. Just because they are natural, doesn’t mean essential oils are totally safe for cats. See my FELINE page for more on essential oils for cats. 

WAYS TO USE OILS  1 TOPICAL, 2 ORAL, 3 AIR DIFFUSER/NEBULIZERS

Products (best brand)Product page | DiffuserWorld.com

Products & Info: Nature’s Gift aromatherapy accessories: aromalamps, essential oil diffusers, bottles, nebulizors, etc.

WHICH TYPE OF DIFFUSION IS BEST?

An essential oil diffuser is a device that enables pure essential oils to slowly evaporate into the surrounding environment for the purpose of scenting the air, purifying the air, and for therapeutic benefit.

1) Heat – By applying heat through burning a candle or electricity, the increased temperature will cause the essential oil to evaporate into the air releasing an aroma. Pros: Heat will gently produce a scent and fill a room nicely with only a minimum amount of essential oil. Most are economically priced.Cons:  Heat has two drawbacks. First, it tends to alter the chemical composition of the essential oil which can destroy its purity and therapeutic value. Second, it may not be therapeutically useful because the size and availability of breathable molecules are mostly filtered out by the nose hairs and nasal cavity

2) Fan / Ventilation – By utilizing a small fan to create airflow, evaporation is achieved when air passes over a wick or absorbent pad which holds the essential oil. Pros: Ventilation offers an economical and simple way to provide evaporation. With no heat involved, the chemical composition of the essential oil remains intact. Ventilation is a good way to scent a room as long as it’s not too large. Oil usage is minimal. Usually economically priced. Cons: Aroma has limited reach. The minimal size and availability of breathable molecules compromises therapeutic benefits. 

3) Vaporization / Humidification – By using water and essential oil mixed together, a mist can be formed which will fill the air. This mist is produced through ultrasonic waves assisted with a fan to force the mist into the environment. Pros: Humidification alone has many benefits especially in dry climates and the negative ions in the water vapor can help filter the air. Using vaporization with essential oils will produce a nice scent in an average sized room. Many vaporizers are equipped with colorful lighting, and a variety of timer options, and are whisper quiet. Essential oil usage is minimal.  Cons: Humidification can be undesirable in high-humidity climates and is a less effective way to provide aromatherapy because the majority of the mist is water vapor which quickly drops from the air. Most vaporizers will only run up to five hours on a single filling.

4) Atomization  This new technology uses a cold air pump to force essential oil molecules through an atomizer and into very tiny particles; these atomized molecules become a micro fine vapor that float through the air and keep your environment therapeutically rich for extended periods of time. Pros: Atomization is absolutely the best way to provide both aroma and therapeutic healing value with essential oils because it does not alter the chemical composition of the oils. It breaks down pure essential oil molecules without separation of the mixture. It produces a particle size small enough for the lungs and body to absorb them rapidly. Most are equipped with built-in timers and pressure output controls for full control over the oil consumption. No method of diffusing is as effective in preserving the natural healing qualities of essential oils. Cons:  Units can be more expensive as it is more costly to create a steady pressurized air flow than to create heat or rotate a fan. Cold air jet technology is not silent. More oil is consumed.

COMMON ESSENTIAL OILS

CALMING

doglavendarLavender (the classic go-to), Chamomile (panic), Sandalwood (constant worry), Peace and Calming (Young Living: Tangerine, Orange, ylang ylang, patchouli, blue tansy). I rarely recommend Young Living as they are overpriced and (my opinion) I do not feel their business carries the intent and loving essence we expect our essential oils to impart. That said, I have seen miraculous calming with animals with this scent and have it in my emergency kit. You could easily make your own but I enjoy the scent of their mix and consider it an expensive treat. 

Other ideas – you may need the ones above and these next ones yourself! Clary sage (sleeplessness),  Peppermint (lightheadedness or depression), Frankincense (depression, anti-anxiety).  As long as you have the oils out, remember to treat yourself.  The calmer you are, the calmer your pet will feel.

WHAT IS A HYDROSOL?

Water or oil infused with a small amount of essential oil (usually one drop). Most often in a spray mister, dropper or bowl.

RECOMMENDED BOOKS 

aromathbookHMP           aromathforpetsHMP

 

MY FAVORITE SOURCES ~ HIGH QUALITY ESSENTIAL OILS

NATURE’S GIFT: Aromatherapy – healing with pure essential oils.

WARNINGS  & SAFETY NOTES

Some of the most beneficial oils can prove harmful under certain conditions. Concentrated oils are very strong, and just because a product is natural doesn’t mean that it’s harmless. Inappropriate use can often lead to adverse and damaging side effects.

Oils to avoid for pets and people with epilepsy: Fennel (Sweet) Foeniculum vulgar, Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis), Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), Sage (Salvia officinalis), Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium). Other oils should not be used while pregnant, on those with sensitive skin and more – know your oils. They are medicinal and can be dangerous if used improperly.

Essential Oils to Avoid with Animals*

Anise Mugwort
Birch Mustard
Bitter Almond Oregano
Boldo Pennyroyal
Calamus Thyme
Camphor Rue
Cassia Santalina
Chenopodium Sassafras
Clove Leaf and Bud Savory
Crested Lavender Tansy
Garlic Terebinth
Goosefoot Thuja
Horseradish Wintergreen
Hyssop Wormwood
Juniper Yarrow

 

Essential Oils to Avoid with Cats* 

High in Monoterpene Hydrocarbons

Lemon Lime
Orange Bergamot
Tangerine Pine
Mandarin Spruce
Grapefruit Fir

High in Phenols

Cassia (cinnamon) Thyme
Clove Savory
Oregano

*From Holistic Aromatherapy for Animals by Kristen Leigh Bell

SAFETY AND WARNING LINKS, READ MORE: http://www.naturesgift.com/warnings.htm#ixzz36GJlY1VY and Essential Oil safety, warnings and hazards for safe use in Aromatherapy

 

CANCER

This cancer home remedy chart is meant only as a quick reference guide on what essential oils have shown anti-cancer activity for various cancers. Use it to encourage your own spirit and as a reference to start a discussion with your holistic health care providers. A study 2003 study at Brigham Young University found low concentrations of essential oils were very effective at inhibiting cancer cell growth without damaging the healthy cells and the harmful side effects of traditional treatment. Remember, with all disease, the emotional, detox and nutritional components must be addressed as well ~ that truly may hold the key for complete healing.

To find out more about the difference between tumors and cancer, click here and here for  horse cancer information.

Essential Oil Use Chart for Cancer – Humans and Animals 
Essential Oil Brain Tumors Breast
Cancer
Cervical
Cancer
Liver
Cancer
Lung
Cancer
Skin
Cancer
Prostate
Cancer
Balsam Fir
Abies balsamea
x x
Clove
Syzygium aromaticum
x x
Dill
Anethum graveolens
x
Cypress
Cypressus sempervirens
x x x
Douglas Fir
Pseudotsuga menziesii
x
Grapefruit
Citrus paradisi
x x
Hyssop
Hyssopus officinalis
x x
Frankincense
Boswellia carterii
x x x x x x x
Lemon
Citrus lemon
x x
Lavender
Lavandula angustifolia
x x x x
Ledum
Ledum groenlandicum
x x x
Myrtle
Myrtus communis
x x
Nutmeg
Myristica fragrans
x
Orange
Citrus sinensis
x x x x
Palo Santo
Bursera graveolens
x x x x x x
Patchouli
Pogostemon cablin
x
Sandalwood
Santalum album
x x x x
Tarragon
Artemisia dracunculus
x x
Tsuga
Tsuga canadensis
x x x
Thyme
Thymus vulgaris
x x x x